What to Do If Your Inheritance Never Arrives?

Updated: Nov 15

There are many ways that an inheritance is lost. This may include diversion by the executor or trustee after the loved one is gone.


This being said, the majority of cases usually happens between the surviving spouse and the children from a former marriage, thus likely to have a substantial impact on the relationships between family members.

If you stand to inherit wealth or assets from an estate, you should be on the lookout for the following signs of potential trouble:

  • Sudden or unexplained change to a Will

  • Large or incremental withdrawals from bank accounts

  • Valuable items missing

  • New names added to bank accounts

  • Money or property transferred out of state or country

  • Unpaid bills and other mismanagement of finances

  • Disputes with creditors

  • Failure to abide by details in a Will or trust documents

  • Ignoring attempts to contact or question the executor or trustee

  • Refusal to send copies of a Will or trust documents

  • No inventory taken of all assets

  • Other beneficiaries being given preferential treatment

  • Unreported sale of assets

  • Payments/distributions to the executor or trustee that are unreasonable or unsupportable

  • No accounting for more than 6 months after death

  • Assets not receiving care – landscape deterioration, leaking roof, vehicle tires flat, lights burn all night

  • Imprudent purchase of stocks, bonds, gold, silver, real estate, etc.

If you suspect that your inheritance has disappeared, you should take the following steps:

  • Find copies of all Wills and trust documents

  • Get a copy of the death certificate

  • Determine contact information for the person who is supposed to manage the estate

  • Find out the date and location where the Will was executed

  • Track down the person who witnessed the signing of the Will, get a statement from them and ask them if the Will was adequately explained to the deceased

  • Acquire medical records and bills for medical procedures

  • Talk to relatives to see if anything unusual happened just before and after death

  • Locate assets of the estate

  • Consult with an experienced lawyer familiar with trust or will litigation

Writing your Will is the very first step. Equally important is to store your Will online, to ensure that it will be found in a timely manner. liteWill is the only global platform which offers the solution to store your Will online.


‘A Will that is not online is like a Will that does not exist’


This portion of the website is for information only. The statements and opinions are the expression of their author, not of liteWill, and have not been evaluated for accuracy, completeness or changes in the law. Information contained in this article is not a substitute for tax or legal advice.

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